What to Do When Your Plant Leaves Turning Yellow?

If you’ve been keeping an eye on your plants and have noticed that plant leaves turning yellow, don’t panic. There may be a perfectly reasonable explanation, such as a nutrient deficiency. 

However, it’s also important to be aware of the other potential causes of yellow leaves so that you can address the issue as soon as possible. This blog post will discuss the most common causes of yellow leaves on plants and what you can do to remedy them.

Lack of nutrients

One of the most common reasons for yellow leaves is a lack of nutrients. If your plant isn’t getting enough nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium, its leaves will start to yellow.

A disease or a mineral insufficiency may cause yellowing. If no pests are apparent, this is likely caused by a mineral deficiency, commonly calcium or boron.

If the yellowing of your plant’s leaves is irregular (i.e., not all of the leaves are yellow or the yellowing is patchy), this could be a sign of a nutrient deficiency.

If the yellow leaves on your plant are accompanied by leaf deformities (such as curled or wilted leaves), this is usually a sign of stress. The stress could be caused by anything from pests to extreme weather conditions.

To determine what’s causing the yellow leaves on your plant, it’s essential to look at the leaves themselves. If they’re yellow all over, it’s likely a nutrient deficiency.

If the yellowing is irregular, check for signs of pests or stress. And if you see any leaf deformities, that’s usually an indication of stress. With a little investigation, you should be able to figure out what’s causing the yellow leaves on your plant and take steps to fix the problem!

The solution to this problem is simple: fertilize your plants! You can either use a fertilizer containing all three of these nutrients or apply them separately.

Another solution could be to remove the plant and repot it with fresh potting soil (with new nutrients) to start a new cycle.[1]

Watering

Too much or too little water can cause leaves to turn yellow.

Overwatering

Roots can’t breathe in excessively wet soil. They suffocate, shut down, and cease to provide water and nutrients to plants.

Overwatering signs are:

  • yellow leaves that feel soggy or limp.
  • Yellow leaves with brown or black spots.
  • Leaves fall off easily.
  • Soil that’s always wet or mushy.

The solution to this problem is to water your plants less frequently. Let the top inch of soil dry out between waterings, and don’t water again until it’s dry.

Under Watering

Underwatering, also known as drought, has a comparable influence. Plants can’t obtain essential minerals when there isn’t enough water. The leaves become yellow.

If your plant has yellow leaves that curl, crisp, and dry up in the center, it’s likely underwater. Also, expect to see older, lower leaves drop. The answer is to water your plants.

Underwater, the signs are:

  • Those yellow leaves are drooping or crisping.
  • leaves with brown or black tips.
  • Curling inward, yellow leaves

If you think your plant is underwater, water it immediately. Make sure to water deeply so that the roots are getting enough moisture. After watering, recheck the soil in a few hours to see if it’s still dry. Suppose it is water again.

The solution to this problem is to water your plant more frequently. Water deeply so that the roots get enough moisture, and recheck the soil in a few hours to see if it’s still dry. Suppose it is water again.

Drainage

If the yellow leaves on your plant are accompanied by root rot, it’s likely a drainage issue. When roots sit in water, they start to rot. This prevents them from absorbing nutrients and supplying water to the plant.

The solution to this problem is to improve the drainage of your plant’s potting mix. Add perlite or sand to the potting mix to improve drainage. If you still have problems, try repotting your plant in a pot with drainage holes.

Pests and diseases

Because there are so many possible causes, pinpointing the reason for yellowed leaves is often tricky. We haven’t discussed pests or diseases yet. Plants are attacked by sucking insects both inside and outside.

Pests could cause yellow leaves. Common culprits include aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, and spider mites. These pests suck the sap out of plants, causing the leaves to be yellow.

Many of these insects are too small to be seen with the naked eye, and the plant’s reaction to their feeding activity is used to identify them.

The parasites are sucking the plant’s sap, which is the lifeblood of the plant. The plant’s defense reduces overall health, including stippled and yellowing leaves. Leaves may crinkle and drop away as a result of the disease.

The solution to this problem is to treat your plant with an insecticide. You can either use a chemical insecticide or a natural one made from ingredients like neem oil or garlic.

Diseases could also cause yellow leaves. The most common disease that causes yellow leaves is “leaf spot.” Leaf spot is caused by fungi or bacteria and appears as yellow or brown spots on the leaves.

The solution to this problem is to treat your plant with a fungicide. You can either use a chemical fungicide or a natural one made from ingredients like baking soda or garlic.

Soil Issues

Soil can be a possible reason your plant’s leaves could be yellow because of soil issues. The most common soil issue that causes yellow leaves is nutrient deficiency.

If your plant’s leaves are yellowing or fading to green, it’s likely a sign of too much nitrogen in the soil. Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plants, but too much can cause problems.

However, flush the soil with water to remove excess nitrogen. You can also add organic matter to the soil to help reduce the amount of nitrogen.

The solution to this problem is to fertilize your plants. You can either use chemical fertilizer or a natural one made from ingredients like compost or manure.

Root Damage

Roots are susceptible to various infections, especially those that damage the root structure or cause plant death. Root diseases are often found in root-bound plants or those with poor drainage.

Any assault on roots can impair a plant’s access to moisture and nutrients, severely limiting its health. Roots may decay away, leaving the plant with few alternatives for self-preservation.

The solution to this problem is to improve the drainage of your plant’s potting mix. Add perlite or sand to the potting mix to improve drainage. If you still have problems, try repotting your plant in a pot with drainage holes.

Lighting

One of the most common reasons for yellow leaves is too little or too much light.

All plants need light to grow, but different plants need different amounts of light. If a plant doesn’t get enough light, it will start to stretch out, and the leaves will turn yellow.

While too little light will cause yellow leaves, too much light will also cause yellow leaves. If the leaves are yellow and crispy, it’s a sign that they’re getting too much light.

The solution to this problem is to move your plant to a location where it will receive the appropriate light.

Temperature Stress

Plants can also suffer from temperature stress. Whole plant yellowing can also be caused by temperature stress. If your plant’s leaves are yellow and wilted, it’s a sign that the plant is too hot.

It’s most likely a case of being too cold or too hot for your plant where it is placed. This will often be a paler yellow or whitish-yellow. Too much temperature fluctuation around the plant, or apparent temperature fluctuations like a radiator, are also possible causes.

The solution to this problem is to move your plant to a more fantastic location. If you can’t do that, try adding a fan.

Natural Leaf Shedding

One final reason for yellow leaves is that they’re simply part of the plant’s natural life cycle. Many plants shed their leaves in the fall, and new leaves grow in the spring.

The solution to this problem is to wait patiently for new growth. The yellowing and shedding of leaves are typical for many plants, so there is no need to be alarmed. Just wait for new growth to appear in the spring.

FAQs

Is it possible for yellow leaves to become green once again?

Chlorophyll gives a leaf its green hue. When the leaf’s chlorophyll fades, the plant stops feeding it and begins to absorb nutrients from the leaF. As a result, you can’t always reverse yellow leaves back to green.

Is it necessary to remove yellow foliage from the plant?

It’s typically fine to remove a few yellowed leaves from your plant. Yellow foliage keeps your plant looking healthy and your garden growing lush. Removing yellow leaves may also decrease the chance of disease, which is more likely to develop on decaying leaves rather than on thriving ones.

What does it mean if my plant’s leaves are yellow? Is there too much water?


If your plant’s leaves become yellow, it’s usually a sign that you’re overwatering or underwatering it. Plants require water to live, and if they don’t receive enough of it, they will drop leaves to save water.

Is it possible for too much sunshine to produce yellow leaves?

Sunburn. Plants require light, but too much of a good thing might impact plant health and cause leaves to turn yellow. Sunburn may leave black burn-like marks on the leaves or cause complete leaf yellowing due to excessive exposure to sunshine.

Does Epsom salt assist in the treatment of yellowing leaves?

If more mature foliage is turning yellow and curling. For each foot of plant height, use one tablespoon of Epsom salts in four cups of water as a foliar spray. If magnesium is applied to the leaves, it is absorbed readily.

Conclusion

Yellow leaves on your plant are regular and usually nothing to worry about. If you’re concerned, try one of the solutions listed above. And if all else fails, consult a plant expert. They can help you figure out what’s wrong and how to fix it.

We hope this article was helpful. Yellow leaves are regular and usually nothing to worry about, but if you’re concerned, try.

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